Master Thesis

Master Thesis

If you would like to write a thesis with the Chair of Statistics & Econometrics, please follow these steps:

Before you start:

  1. Before submitting your application at our chair, make sure that you fulfill all requirements set out in the examination rules (Prüfungsordnung).
  2. Send an email to vanewijk@uni-mainz.de in which you apply for our supervision of your thesis. You should include the following information:
  • A recent transcript of your grades & the courses you have taken
  • A curriculum vitae
  • Your degree program & the number of semesters you have been studying
  • A short letter of motivation that describes your general area(s) of interest
  • If you already have an idea for a topic: a description of this topic, including if possible, an indication of which data set(s) you plan to be using

Please note that you may either work on a topic that you come up with yourself, or you can work on a topic proposed by our chair. (See below for some suggestions.)

  1. We will contact you after your submission to set up an appointment to discuss your topic choice with you.
  2. Next, you are required to draft an exposé based on the discussed topic. The exposé should give an overview of what you plan to write in your master thesis, including relevance of the topic, placement in the literature, contribution of your work as well as an outline of the analysis plan and the dataset you will be using. It should be a maximum of 4 pages long (excl. references).

While writing your thesis:

  1. Only officially register your thesis once you have received access to the data that you will be working with. After registration, you have 4 months to complete your thesis.
  2. After each meeting with your supervisor: send your supervisor a document with a summary of the main points discussed and agreed upon during the meeting. Do this within two working days after the meeting.
  3. Stick to the guidelines for writing a master thesis at our chair which can be found here.
  4. During your work on your thesis, you will be required to informally present your thesis at our colloquium. Our chair organizes one colloquium per semester during which all current master and PhD students present their work. Your presentation will not be graded, but the colloquium will serve as an important source of feedback.
  5. You are expected to be present during the entire colloquium, as well as (if applicable) during other colloquiums that take place during the time you work on your thesis, and to participate in the following each presentation.

After finishing your thesis:

  1. Besides submitting your thesis to the Examinations Office (Prüfungsamt), note that it is mandatory to submit an electronic version (MS Word or pdf) of your thesis and to send us your relevant Stata-files. Please send these to sekretariat.vanewijk@uni-mainz.de.
  2. 4-6 weeks after submission, you need to present your thesis in a graded presentation.

 

Master thesis topics

Below you find a list of proposals for master thesis topics that can be supervised at our chair. If you would like a full description, please send an email to sekretariat.vanewijk@uni-mainz.de. Please note that some topics are tied to a specific supervisor. Availability of the topics may therefore depend on the availability of the respective supervisor.

Is teaching based on problem solving more effective than lecture style teaching?

Effects of war on the shares of males/females among newborns

Cesarean sections and infant health at birth

Exposure to Ramadan during pregnancy and the distribution of health in later-life

112 emergency calls: Life-saving effects on cardiac arrest patients of a software package that enables 112 response staff to answer emergency calls in a structured way

The long-run effect of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic: intergenerational effects of the Spanish Flu

The long-run effect of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic in the USA: Does the data source matter?

The Spanish Flu in Spain

More doctor visits after retirement?

Smoking bans and smoking behavior

Mexico’s war on drugs: do elections increase violence?